5 Tips for Taking Your Meds When You Travel

Traveling with prescription medications can pose some unexpected problems that can create havoc on a trip. To avoid problems, plan ahead.

  1. Bring your prescriptions in their original containers that are properly and clearly labeled. Don’t bring pill minders, mix different pills in one bottle or put them in resealed plastic bags.
  2. Take enough for your trip plus a week or two extra in case of delays so you won’t run out.
  3. Carry all prescriptions with you on the plane. Do not put them in checked bags.  They might not make it to your destination.
  4. Forget your vitamins or other non-essential items.
  5. Find out if it’s legal to bring your prescription into the country you are traveling to. Drugs like Adderall are illegal in many countries even if legally prescribed in the U.S. Over the counter preparations with Sudafed are illegal in Japan.

If you lose a prescription or run out of medication abroad, pharmacies are unlikely to accept prescriptions called or faxed by your U.S. provider.

Heat Exhaustion – Travel Tip Tuesday

You dont have to travel  far to  feel too hot this summer. Know what to do when you get too hot and how to get cooled off. Early action can prevent heat exhaution from progressing to heat stroke. And drink, drink, drink (non-alchololic beverages, that is).

Travel Tip Tuesday

Did you know that road crashes are the single greatest cause of death for healthy Americans traveling abroad?  Americans are traveling increasingly to countries where the chances of being killed or seriously injured may be from 20 to 40 times greater than in the U.S. The Know Before You Go program offered by the Association for Safe International Road Travel provides tips so you won’t become a statistic. Oh yeah and don’t forget to buckle up, wear a helmet, look every which way when you cross and don’t drive distracted by anything!

Top Travel Apps

Even if you dont have internet access you can still take advantage of these great resources. Here are some great apps to take with you when you travel.

Do you have any other favorite travel apps to add to our list?

Favorite Foto Friday- Painful Poppy Pictures

Painful poppy pictures

The kindness of strangers.

It’s easy to get injured when you travel, especially when you are taking a photo and wearing sandals on an uneven unpaved road and keep backing up to get the right angle. I was bleeding and found out later I broke a toe. In the next town, while I cleaned myself up, the waiter brought me a cold can of Coke, for my foot and a glass of wine for my pain. It was 9 am and I was grateful for both.  Where was I?

Travel Tip Tuesday

Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP)
The Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) is a free service provided by the U.S. Government to U.S. citizens who are traveling to, or living in, a foreign country. STEP allows you to enter information about your upcoming trip abroad so that the Department of State can better assist you in an emergency. Sign up for Travel Alerts.

Dirty Needles?

Traveling in under developed countries poses some unique challenges. What if I get cut and need stitches? What if I have a dental emergency? Get diarrhea so bad I need IV rehydration? Will they have properly sterilized equipment?

You can purchase syringe and suture kits to take with you. These are not do it yourself kits. They are to be given to a trained health care provider to use on you in such emergencies.

Typically, these kits contain needles, suture materials, IV catheters, gloves and antiviral and antibacterial wipes to close wounds and start IV’s. They can be used to administer anesthetics for emergency dental procedures, too.

To help with going through customs,  get a note from your travel clinic provider that states that these items are being used for personal use only. One kit from Adventure Medical Kits has declaratory statements about use printed on the outside in 8 different languages.

Many travel clinics, including Travel Health of New Hampshire, have these kits available for purchase. Hopefully you will never need to use such a kit,  but in countries where blood borne diseases such as HIV and hepatitis are common, it is reassuring to know that if you the equipment used on you is definitely sterile.